Friday, July 2, 2010

Letters

I recently saw the film Letters to Juliet (as in Capulet) which was every bit as girly and sappy and swoony as I expected it to be. Of course there was a happy ending - birds chirped and deer ate out of my hand Disney style. But that's not what I thought was interesting.

I'm not sure if it exists or not. I haven't done any formal research. And though I've been to Italy, I've never been to Verona to actually see if Juliet's balcony and the wall leading to the balcony actually exists. Until now, I had never considered that Shakespeare wrote his his play based on anything except pure fantasy. I do know that Romeo and Juliet is not among the group of plays deemed by academics "The Historical Plays" like Macbeth or Richard III. Honestly, I never really cared at all about whether or not there truly were Capulets or Montagues. The story, though interesting, just isn't that good, especially compared with the genius of Lear.

The interesting thing about Letters to Juliet is that the entire story depends on the idea that there is such a thing as Juliet's balcony and that women from all over the world write letters about their love lives or lack thereof and ask for Juliet's advice by placing their letters between the bricks and mortar in the wall that Romeo would've climbed to get to the balcony.

Of course we understand that Juliet can't answer - she very literally guts herself with Romeo's dagger when she awakens from her death-like slumber in the tomb and sees that Romeo is really dead thanks to one of the worst miscommunications in Western history. It's her spirit that is supposed to answer. That and four women who have taken it upon themselves to collect the letters daily and write responses to those who are heartbroken, indecisive, confused, and/or afraid.

That's the part I like.

The Juliet club answers letters in an effort to support these women in the spirit of Juliet, the one who abandoned her entire being to love and who both learned and taught a valuable lesson about the consequences of decisions we make. It's Ann Landers meets romance, but in a much more passionate venue. Ah Italy... (swoon)

It's a terribly romantic idea, I think.

This post was inspired by the Loose Bloggers Consortium, a small and feisty(!) global community. We write weekly on a common topic (Letters, this week) and post responses - all of us together, simultaneously, from all over the world. (Lovely!) Please visit Anu, Ashok, Conrad, gaelikaa, Grannymar, Judy, Magpie 11, Maria and Ramana for other wonderful posts.

7 comments:

K A B L O O E Y said...

I'm also a Lear fan -- that's my favorite tragedy. Haven't seen Letters to Juliet because I don't see much these days and I'm not a fan of sappy movies. But. I really appreciate your thoughts on the subject, because I am kind of a romantic in real life. I think that gender plays a role here too; I can't imagine a Letters to Romeo.

Rummuser said...

This Romeo, wrote many love letters to his beloved, but she never replied to even one. Not before, not after they got married and lived happily ever after till she decided to leave for a better world. She was simply not the writing type. The romance flourished nevertheless. I like the new story though. I wish that she could have outsourced the writing to the Philippines as she lived in India!

Grannymar said...

I must watch out for Letters to Juliet, I love to read love letters and have on occasion written one or two!

Conrad said...

Methinks you identify with the noble labors of the four women. I think you would have the strength, wisdom, experience and firmly grounded perspective - oh, did I mention intelligence - to be a magnificent guide. Actually, you already are doing that.

gaelikaa said...

But who writes these letters anyway? Are they serious or what? Heard of them before. Must check out that movie.

Christine said...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juliet_Capulet#Casa_di_Giulietta

http://www.julietclub.com/index_en.asp

cool!

Ginger said...

Cool! Thanks!!!

Friday, July 2, 2010

Letters

I recently saw the film Letters to Juliet (as in Capulet) which was every bit as girly and sappy and swoony as I expected it to be. Of course there was a happy ending - birds chirped and deer ate out of my hand Disney style. But that's not what I thought was interesting.

I'm not sure if it exists or not. I haven't done any formal research. And though I've been to Italy, I've never been to Verona to actually see if Juliet's balcony and the wall leading to the balcony actually exists. Until now, I had never considered that Shakespeare wrote his his play based on anything except pure fantasy. I do know that Romeo and Juliet is not among the group of plays deemed by academics "The Historical Plays" like Macbeth or Richard III. Honestly, I never really cared at all about whether or not there truly were Capulets or Montagues. The story, though interesting, just isn't that good, especially compared with the genius of Lear.

The interesting thing about Letters to Juliet is that the entire story depends on the idea that there is such a thing as Juliet's balcony and that women from all over the world write letters about their love lives or lack thereof and ask for Juliet's advice by placing their letters between the bricks and mortar in the wall that Romeo would've climbed to get to the balcony.

Of course we understand that Juliet can't answer - she very literally guts herself with Romeo's dagger when she awakens from her death-like slumber in the tomb and sees that Romeo is really dead thanks to one of the worst miscommunications in Western history. It's her spirit that is supposed to answer. That and four women who have taken it upon themselves to collect the letters daily and write responses to those who are heartbroken, indecisive, confused, and/or afraid.

That's the part I like.

The Juliet club answers letters in an effort to support these women in the spirit of Juliet, the one who abandoned her entire being to love and who both learned and taught a valuable lesson about the consequences of decisions we make. It's Ann Landers meets romance, but in a much more passionate venue. Ah Italy... (swoon)

It's a terribly romantic idea, I think.

This post was inspired by the Loose Bloggers Consortium, a small and feisty(!) global community. We write weekly on a common topic (Letters, this week) and post responses - all of us together, simultaneously, from all over the world. (Lovely!) Please visit Anu, Ashok, Conrad, gaelikaa, Grannymar, Judy, Magpie 11, Maria and Ramana for other wonderful posts.

7 comments:

K A B L O O E Y said...

I'm also a Lear fan -- that's my favorite tragedy. Haven't seen Letters to Juliet because I don't see much these days and I'm not a fan of sappy movies. But. I really appreciate your thoughts on the subject, because I am kind of a romantic in real life. I think that gender plays a role here too; I can't imagine a Letters to Romeo.

Rummuser said...

This Romeo, wrote many love letters to his beloved, but she never replied to even one. Not before, not after they got married and lived happily ever after till she decided to leave for a better world. She was simply not the writing type. The romance flourished nevertheless. I like the new story though. I wish that she could have outsourced the writing to the Philippines as she lived in India!

Grannymar said...

I must watch out for Letters to Juliet, I love to read love letters and have on occasion written one or two!

Conrad said...

Methinks you identify with the noble labors of the four women. I think you would have the strength, wisdom, experience and firmly grounded perspective - oh, did I mention intelligence - to be a magnificent guide. Actually, you already are doing that.

gaelikaa said...

But who writes these letters anyway? Are they serious or what? Heard of them before. Must check out that movie.

Christine said...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juliet_Capulet#Casa_di_Giulietta

http://www.julietclub.com/index_en.asp

cool!

Ginger said...

Cool! Thanks!!!