Friday, August 20, 2010

Tears

I wonder if, along with pivotal, history changing folks like Harriett Beecher Stowe and Fredrick Douglas, my state will also delete the lessons learned from significant people and/or events such as The Trail of Tears in its public school curriculum:
In 1838 and 1839, as part of Andrew Jackson's Indian removal policy, the Cherokee nation was forced to give up its lands east of the Mississippi River and to migrate to an area in present-day Oklahoma. The Cherokee people called this journey the "Trail of Tears," because of its devastating effects. The migrants faced hunger, disease, and exhaustion on the forced march. Over 4,000 out of 15,000 of the Cherokees died. This picture, The Trail of Tears, was painted by Robert Lindneux in 1942. It commemorates the suffering of the Cherokee people under forced removal. If any depictions of the "Trail of Tears" were created at the time of the march, they have not survived. Image Credit: The Granger Collection, New York
Sarcasm aside, the conservative right movement in my state is INEXCUSABLE..
I have to move before we excuse slavery by using Biblical references ... again.

4 comments:

Rummuser said...

Australia, The USA and now we in India are all guilty of generating such trail of tears. We over here are determined to get our tribals out of their traditional lands in the forests so that we can mine for various ores! The price they pay for progress!

gaelikaa said...

These little known facts are so disturbing. They were in fact crimes against humanity. They should be brought up at every opportunity. Thanks for this, Ginger.

Grannymar said...

This type of thing goes on across the globe hidden under different hats. Ireland is no different.

Maria said...

Yes, this will soon be taken out of our text books and replaced with something dealing with Creationism and how God created the Indian and painted him red or some other drivel of near-retardation.

I do hope people will wake up and realize what they are doing to our history.

A great view of the subject, Tears.

Friday, August 20, 2010

Tears

I wonder if, along with pivotal, history changing folks like Harriett Beecher Stowe and Fredrick Douglas, my state will also delete the lessons learned from significant people and/or events such as The Trail of Tears in its public school curriculum:
In 1838 and 1839, as part of Andrew Jackson's Indian removal policy, the Cherokee nation was forced to give up its lands east of the Mississippi River and to migrate to an area in present-day Oklahoma. The Cherokee people called this journey the "Trail of Tears," because of its devastating effects. The migrants faced hunger, disease, and exhaustion on the forced march. Over 4,000 out of 15,000 of the Cherokees died. This picture, The Trail of Tears, was painted by Robert Lindneux in 1942. It commemorates the suffering of the Cherokee people under forced removal. If any depictions of the "Trail of Tears" were created at the time of the march, they have not survived. Image Credit: The Granger Collection, New York
Sarcasm aside, the conservative right movement in my state is INEXCUSABLE..
I have to move before we excuse slavery by using Biblical references ... again.

4 comments:

Rummuser said...

Australia, The USA and now we in India are all guilty of generating such trail of tears. We over here are determined to get our tribals out of their traditional lands in the forests so that we can mine for various ores! The price they pay for progress!

gaelikaa said...

These little known facts are so disturbing. They were in fact crimes against humanity. They should be brought up at every opportunity. Thanks for this, Ginger.

Grannymar said...

This type of thing goes on across the globe hidden under different hats. Ireland is no different.

Maria said...

Yes, this will soon be taken out of our text books and replaced with something dealing with Creationism and how God created the Indian and painted him red or some other drivel of near-retardation.

I do hope people will wake up and realize what they are doing to our history.

A great view of the subject, Tears.